Thüringian Chickens

Thuringian Chicken
No. of Eggs
2.5/5
Easy to Keep?
3.5/5

Uses: Exhibition and Rare Breed Conservation.
Origin: Germany.
Eggs:
140 -180 White per year.
Weight: Cock: 2 – 2.5 Kg. Hen: 1.5 – 2 Kg.
Bantam Cock: 700 g. Hen: 600 g.
Colours: Black, Chamois Spangled, Gold Spangled, Silver Spangled (Standardised UK) Buff, Blue, Cuckoo and White also exist in Germany.
Useful to Know: Active chickens that were once useful dual purpose fowl and now a very rare breed.
Photo: A silver spangked Thüringian male. Photo courtesy of Claire Scowcroft.

Thüringian chickens have been seen in the UK since early 2000 but was originally created in the Thüringen state in Germany with the first mention of the breed being as far back as the 1790’s.Head of Thuringian Chicken

Originally, the breed was known as the Pausbäcken (chubby chops) and was a dual purpose utility breed kept by small farms in the region. The Thüringian didn’t get its current German name of Thüringer Barthuhn (Thüringian Bearded) there until it was standardised in 1907. They are thought to be related to Dutch Owlbeards but there is some uncertainty about this. Photo Right: A rare black Thüringian, belonging to Wendy Shackel.

Photos

Books

The following books are available. Links take you to the Amazon or other sellers’ pages for the books.

Breed Clubs

These are the breed clubs for Thuringian chickens:

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Thüringian